10 questions on how bicyclists and pedestrians will interact with autonomous vehicles

Mobility Lab recently participated in a Twitter chat hosted by the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center of the University of North Carolina.

It was a fun way to synthesize the latest thinking from other key players who took part, including America Walks, SAE International, Walk Friendly Communities, the Vision Zero Network, the National Association of City Transportation Officials, the National Safety Council’s Road to Zero, and others.

PBIC compiled the top tweets here. Meanwhile, here were our answers to PBIC’s 10 burning questions.

Q1. What activities are you or your organization working on that relate to automated or connected vehicles?

Mobility Lab: On October 6, Mobility Lab is co-hosting a symposium on the policy implications of AVs for cities and regions. We have other speaking engagements and projects ongoing on AVs as well that we’ll discuss more soon.

We love AVs but are worried they’ll create car trips & break up communities if introduced incorrectly.

Q2. What are the most important ways that pedestrians and bicyclists might be impacted by more automated vehicles in the future?

Lots of work ahead on this: Why it’s so difficult for autonomous vehicles to see bikes.

If tech allows AVs to safely speed through mixed-use community centers and downtowns, the quality of life for people who bike and walk could go down.

Q3. How can engineers and designers prioritize people who bike and walk with the advancement of AVs?

AVs present an historic moment for planners, policymakers to rethink and redesign transportation mistakes of the past.

Priorities come in different forms. If you want engineers to learn to prioritize for bikers, you need to put them on a bike.

Here are 5 ways cities and counties can make sure autonomous vehicles and bikes mix safely.

Veröffentlichung:
12. Oktober 2017

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